Book Review: A Reader’s Hebrew and Greek Bible

Just before Easter, Andrew Rogers at Zondervan was kind enough to send me a review copy of A Reader’s Hebrew and Greek Bible.  This new bible consists of the previously-published Reader’s Hebrew Bible, edited by A. Philip Brown and Bryan W. Smith, and the Reader’s Greek New Testament (2nd Ed), edited by Richard J. Goodrich and Albert L. Lukaszewski, bound into one beautiful volume.  If you’re like me, and have been hoping for the day when these two wonderful works would appear in print together, you will NOT be disappointed.

In case you are unfamiliar with the Reader’s texts published by Zondervan, they include the Hebrew/Aramaic and Greek texts of the Old and New Testaments along with footnote definitions of all words appearing less than 100 times in Hebrew or 30 times in Greek (definitions of all words appearing more than 100 time or 30 times, respectively, appear at the end of each testament).  The critical apparatus of the original language texts is not included, so this Bible will not replace the standard critical editions for textual criticism work; however, that is not its purpose.  The intent of this Bible is to increase the reader’s ability to pick up the Greek/Hebrew texts and read without a continual need to refer to lexicons and look up unfamiliar vocabulary, and for this purpose the Reader’s Hebrew and Greek Bible excels!

The Greek New Testament text used is that underlying the Today’s New International Version (TNIV) New Testament.  There are places where this text differs from the main reading presented in the United Bible Society (UBS) text, based upon decisions made by the TNIV translators to utilize some of the multitude of textual variants detailed in the UBS text.  In each of these instances, the TNIV and UBS texts are listed side-by-side in a footnote for reader’s to compare.  The Hebrew Old Testament text comes from the Westminster Leningrad Codex, which differs from the standard BHS critical edition in only a handful of places (only 12 consonantal variations total).  The definitions used in the footnotes and mini-lexicons at the end of each testament are derived from the standard lexica–BDAG, Louw-Nida, LSJ, and Trenchard for the NT; HALOT and BDB for the OT.

As far as the mechanics of this Bible go, the leather used is very finely grained but very thin.  While I expect it to loosen/soften up with use, out of the box the cover is fairly stiff.  Overall, I would say the leather is of higher quality than that typically appearing as “Genuine Leather” in most contemporary Bibles but not nearly as nice as one would find in a high-end (e.g. Cambridge) Bible.  Only time will tell if this thin real leather will stand up as well as the more robust Duo-tone covers used in the separate volumes.  The pages are (thankfully) not ultra-thin and are gilded in silver, which nicely accents the black leather cover.  The binding of this nearly 2.5″ thick Bible is sewn (hooray!), so I expect to be able to get many years of use out of it before rebinding.  Also, there are two ribbon bookmarks (hooray!) and a typical complement of maps, which are located in between the New and Old Testaments. A standard Greek font (i.e., NOT italics like USB or the Reader’s Greek NT, 1st ed) is used that is slightly smaller than the font of the UBS or large-print Nestle-Aland texts but larger than that used in the standard Nestle-Aland edition.  The Hebrew font is larger than the standard size BHS but slightly smaller than the large-print BHS.  I find both fonts very readable.  The only concern I have about how the Bible was put together is that the cover has square corners versus the more typical rounded corners found on leather bound works.  It remains to be seen how well these will hold up through lots of use.

All in all, I highly recommend this Bible for anyone wanting to improve their ability to work in and enjoy the original languages of Scripture.  Whether just starting out as a student of biblical languages, a more advanced student coming to the realization that you cannot read large portions of Hebrew and Greek as easily as you want, or a seasoned pastor wanting to dust off those synapses you haven’t used since seminary, the Reader’s Hebrew and Greek Bible will make a fantastic addition to your array of language tools.

Review: Glo bible software

Glo is bible software like you’ve never seen or experienced. Period.

As Nelson Saba, co-founder of the Glo project has put it, Glo is the bible “re-imagined for a digital world.”

In my more verbose words, Glo is a revolutionary piece of bible study software that makes use of a variety of stunning media to immerse users in God’s word like never before!  After just over a month of using the software…

System Requirements and Installation

The system requirements for Glo are pretty straightforward and typical for recently released software.  They are, according to the Glo website:

  • Microsoft Windows® XP, Vista®, or Windows 7 OS with lastest service pack installed
  • An internet connection
  • At least 18GB of free hard disk space
  • Dual Core Processor
  • 1GB RAM for Microsoft Windows XP, or 2GB RAM for Vista or Windows 7
  • ATI or NVIDIA video graphics card with Microsoft DirectX 9 support
  • DVD Rom Drive

I attempted to install Glo on two different systems with varying success.  The first system I tried was my older 2.0 GHz AMD system with 3 GB of RAM and Win XP.  Though not a dual core processor, Glo installed and ran with no problems whatsoever.  Some of the intense multimedia aspects of Glo bog the system down some (zooming around on maps and playing HD video), but it is nonetheless very usable.  I also tried to install Glo on a 2.5 GHz dual core system with 2 GB of RAM and Win XP with no success.  Immediately after selecting the option to install Glo, the software repeatedly hung up.  There is no telling whether or not there is something quirky with this particular machine or not…did anyone else have problems installing Glo?

Once started, the installation process itself takes a LONG time.  It took well over two hours to install completely, but given that Glo is installing over 3.5 hrs of HD video, over 2300 hi-res photos, over 550 virtual tours, and over 140 hi-res zoomable maps, it isn’t surprising.  Still, it seemed to take longer to install than in actually did because I wanted to dive in and use it!  Patience, friends.  Sit back and read some Job while you’re waiting (grin).

User Interface

The Glo interface is simple, intuitive, and visually appealing.  Everything in the program centers around Bible, Atlas, Timeline, Media, and Topical ‘lenses,’ which makes navigation and use very easy.  Perhaps the best way to describe the interface is just to demonstrate it:

The Experience

In short, Glo is incredible.  Of all the bible study software I regularly use, including Logos and Bibleworks, Glo is the only one that made my thirteen year-old daughter stop and ask, “What’s that?”  More than just stopping, she soon became engrossed with the pictures, videos, and maps that Glo offers.  I’m no expert, but if Glo can captivate a teenage girl and get her involved in bible study, I would call that a resounding success!

As great as this software is, however, there is still room for improvement, especially in the area of searches.  Glo comes with both NIV and KJV bibles (additional bibles are forthcoming, I believe), but there is no way to select only one or the other as part of a search.  Additionally, search results come back from both versions in no particular order (certainly not canonical order).  At first I tried to discern whether some sort of relevance aspect might be in use, but even one-word searches come back in seemingly random order.  In my mind, this quirk keeps me from being able to recommend Glo as one’s only bible study software.  If you know what passages you want to study, Glo is incredible, but if you need the ability to do even simple searches, Glo will frustrate you.  I hope future updates will address this problem.

I mentioned above that my computer is older and not the fastest in the world.  I would really like to try out Glo on a high-end computer system sometime and see how well it performs.  As I said, the lag I experience is a bit annoying but nothing I blame on the software and nothing that keeps it from being completely usable.

Conclusion

As I’ve said throughout, Glo is an amazing piece of software.  The media included in it is unmatched by any other tool I have ever used.  While the search capabilities are not robust enough for me to use as my only bible study software, the media alone is reason enough to recommend Glo to anyone.  If you have any Christmas money lying around that you weren’t sure what to do with, I’d definitely recommend this software.  I hope the Glo team will continue to refine this wonderful software and make it even better.  My thanks to Ken Keim of the Glo support team who was kind enough to send me a copy of Glo to review.

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